ICFMCE 2018 Things to do

Things to do

Discover Tunis

 

A selection of recommended experiences to complete your Tunis holiday

blob.png

Carthage

Overview: The remnants of ancient Carthage - fabled wealthy seafaring city of the Phoenicians - lie scattered across the Bay of Tunis. The evocative tumbled columns and piles of marble rubble are bordered by a panorama of the Mediterranean Sea, which was so fundamental to the city's prosperity. Completely destroyed in the third Punic War in 146 BC, the surviving ruins pale in comparison to some of North Africa's other ancient sites, but this doesn't mean you shouldn't visit. With their seafront setting the ruins have an unbeatable, lost-in-time air. The separate sites are strung out along the bay area and can be easily reached by a mix of walking and using the Tunis Light Railway. Don't skip the views across the entire area from the top of Byrsa Hill.

Suggested Duration: 3-4 hours

 blob.png

Bardo National Museum

Overview: The world's most renowned mosaic collection resides in this opulent palace in Tunis. Along with Cairo's Egyptian Museum, The Bardo is one of North Africa's two top museum experiences. Inside, room after room exhibits gloriously intricate and still vibrantly fresh examples of mosaic art that have been unearthed from sites across the entirety of Tunisia. The Sousse Room, Odysseus Room and Dougga Room have particularly impressive exhibits of this art form, but the entire collection is a treasury and is well worth an entire afternoon of browsing. The ground floor of the building holds some interesting non-mosaic exhibits with displays of the neo-Punic, Christian, and Islamic eras.

Suggested Duration: 3-4 hours

 blob.png

Sidi Bou Said

Overview: The gorgeous Andalusian-style seaside neighbourhood of Sidi Bou Said owes its fame to three young painters. While living here in 1914, Paul Klee, August Macke and Louis Moilliet captured the beauty of its whitewashed buildings and blue doors on canvas. Sidi Bou Said has been something of a bohemian artist's quarter ever since, and is a favoured weekend hangout spot for Tunis locals. There are no tourist attractions as such (that's part of its charm), but you can't fail to be beguiled by the perfect white-and-blue streets, cliff side cafés and picture-postcard shoreline.

Suggested Duration: 1 Day

 blob.png

Medina District

Overview: Chock-a-block full of crumbling buildings found by weaving your way through a procession of ever-skinnier alleyways, the Medina (Old Town) district is Tunis' historic heart and is brimming with sightseeing potential. The main entrance gate, marking the end of the new city and beginning of the old is known as Bab el Bahr (Sea Gate). Built in 1848, it was known as Porte de France during the colonial period. The old town walls of the Hafsid period may have long ago disappeared but once inside mosques, madrassas (Islamic schools of learning), and mausoleums boasting opulent tile work and splendid Fatimid and Ottoman architecture line the twisting streets. Getting lost while meandering and stumbling onto some fabulous monumental relic is half the fun.

Suggested Duration: 3-4 hours 

blob.png

Olive Tree Mosque (Djemma ez Zaitouna)

Overview: The Medina district's great mosque is home to some of the country's finest examples of religious architecture. Begun during the Umayyad dynasty in AD 732, it has been added to and refined by conquering empires in the centuries since. Although non-Muslims cannot enter the prayer hall, visitors are free to wander around the opulent and tranquil exterior courtyard and also to head up to the rooftop where dazzling tile work is on display. The rooftop is also one of the best places in the Medina to get panoramic photographs of the area. Location: Rue Djemma ez Zaitouna.

Suggested Duration: 1-2 hours

 blob.png

St Vincent de Paul Cathedral

Overview: In Tunis' Ville Nouvelle (New Town) stands this imposing cathedral, the largest surviving building of Tunisia's French colonial period. Its bulky neo-Romanesque facade presides grandly over the north end of Place de l'Indépendance and, at the time of construction in 1893, it was a monumental reminder of France's dominance over the country. Inside is the tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Suggested Duration: 1-2 hours

 

blob.png

New Town(Ville Nouvelle)

Overview: A world away from the organic jumble of the Medina, Tunis' Ville Nouvelle was developed during the French colonial era. Its main core is Avenue Habib Bourguiba - a magnificently wide avenue planted with palms and eucalyptus trees. The street heads eastwards, from just outside the Medina on Place de l'Indépendance towards the harbour in a dead straight line.

Suggested Duration: 1-2 hours

 

blob.png

La Goulette (Tunis Port)

Overview: La Goulette is the port suburb of the capital and has been a place of strategic importance (controlling the harbour entrance) since time immemorial. In the reign of the Emperor Charles V, it was the most important Spanish possession in the eastern Maghreb. From 1574 onwards, the Ottoman rulers enlarged and strengthened the fortress built by Spain. La Goulette became a port only during the French colonial period, when the Lake of Tunis silted up and could no longer take ships of any size.

Suggested Duration: 1-2 hours

blob.png

El Djem Amphitheatre

Overview: The walls of the mighty Roman amphitheatre of El Djem dwarf the surrounding modern town. This incredibly well preserved Roman relic is one of the best examples of amphitheatre architecture left standing in the world, reminding of Rome's once grand grip across North Africa. You can still walk the corridors under the arena, just like the gladiators did. Or, climb up to the top seating tiers and sit staring across the arena imagining the battles that took place below.

Suggested Duration: 3-4 hours

 

blob.png

Bulla Regia

Overview: Tunisia has no shortage of Roman ruins, but Bulla Regia near Tabarka is the country's most interesting and intriguing site. Here, the Roman inhabitants coped with the harsh summer climate by ingeniously building their villas underground, which has left the city houses incredibly well preserved today. For history lovers this is a unique opportunity to walk through actual Roman houses, with their walls still intact. It's a glimpse of the residential life of the ancient world that you often don't see.

Suggested Duration: Half Day

 


Important Dates

Submission Deadline(Full paper)April 24,  2018
Submission Deadline(Abstract)April 10,  2018
Author notificationwithin 2 weeks
Final versionBefore May 25, 2018
RegistrationBefore May 25, 2018
Main conferenceNov 23-25, 2018

ICFMCE 2017 Special Session

Session Title: CO2 management

Speakers:

Prof. Flavio Manenti        paper title: AG2S™: a new CO2-reuse technology

Prof.Edwin Zondervan       paper title: CO2 sequestration

Ing. Johanna Kleinekorte       paper title: Life-cycle assessment of CO2 utilization

Submission

All submitted papers need to be original, must not be previously published or accepted for publication elsewhere. must not be under review by any other conference or publication during the review cycle.

Please find the paper format here(submitted papers need to follow the required fonts strictly):Full paper format

Abstract-Template.doc

All submitted papers  will go through a double-blind reviewing process by at least two reviewers drawn from the chairs of committees, also if you dont want to publish any paper, you are welcome to join us as presenter, listener, etc.